Year 5

Reading

We encourage you to read together every day - – there are some great activities on https://literacytrust.org.uk/family-zone/

Maths

There are daily lessons, games and activities available from Carol Vorderman that are age appropriate and linked to the National Curriculum on https://www.themathsfactor.com/

Writing/Whole School Project: Keyingham Village Journal

For your journal entry, think about things you have done with your family that you would like to share and report on. This could include a walk you have been on. You may have done a DIY project, where you made something. Have you baked, or cooked anything special with your family? Have you done anything sporty? Maybe, you have read a book, or watched a film that you really loved.  

Once you have chosen the topic of your journal, you can begin to write about it. You might want to include some photographs too. Whilst writing your journal could you include the following 4 things: 

 

Parenthesis with dashes, or brackets 

Parenthesis is used to add extra information. It can be removed from the sentence and it should still make sense. See examples: 

An on-looking neighbour (Doris, aged 87) described the scene. 

Whilst Barry Johnson prepared himself to light his prized-possession - his BBQ - the Johnson children played in their newly-purchased, inflatable swimming pool (which had taken 3 hours to fill).  

 

Adverbials of time and place 

Adverbials of time are used to say WHEN something happens, whereas adverbials of place describe WHERE something happens. See examples: 

Adverbials of place Adverbials of time 

In the back garden,On Monday 25th May,  

At the park, In the evening,  

Whilst out on a family walk, Last week,  

 

Relative Clause 

A relative clause gives extra information, but uses a relative pronoun to do this. Some examples of these are: where, who, when, what, which, whose 

A comma always comes before the relative pronoun. See example: 

The Johnson’s couldn’t wait to have their family BBQ, which had always been a summer tradition. 

 

Inverted Commas  

Inverted commas (speech marks) are used around words, which are spoken. See example: 

“The whole family had a great bank holiday weekend. The best part was when dad fell in the inflatable pool,” reported Jimmy (Aged 9).

 

Stay safe everyone!

 

Miss Heppleston